New doubts raised on Chinook crash ruling

My first career was as an airman in the Royal Air Force. It was a lowly position working in flight operations. I had no real connection to the Chinooks but I did enjoy the occasional flight with one of the squadrons based in Germany and I recall the absolute professionalism of the aircrew.

I’ve been following this story reported today in CW with interest, and wanted to blog a couple of points. Software does fail and it’s not unheard of for aircraft accidents to have a software problem as one of the factors. Does the fault for the accident lie with the computer or the pilot? Neither in my opinion. If fault is to be pinned on anybody, pin it on the system designers or the people who have responsibility for testing the systems, or the management that allows faulty systems to be put into service.

Don’t pin it on the poor souls lumbered with having to learn how to work around problems. At the end of the day, computers don’t commit crimes, computers don’t crash aircraft. There are human factors every time. Don’t blame the pilots. I never met a reckless one – they all want to get home for their supper.

 

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As you rightly say there are very few reckless pilots, and the ones that do exist are normally spotted very early on by the system. If either of the crew involved in this accident had been of that type it would have shown in their service record. Both, I belive had exemplory records.
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