There's life in the old laptop yet

Businesses will buy laptops over the next 12 months as they look for flexibility for staff

The channel has been hearing about the 'death of the PC' for many years now but most customers still depend on the technology and offices up and down the country are homes to desktops and laptops.

Over the past year the commercial sector has defied gravity in the PC world and kept investing in the technology and that is set to continue into 2018.

Some of that spending has been driven by migration of Windows 10 and towards some of the more mobile form factors and the shift towards using kit that can give staff flexibility should see more spending on laptops, according to Spiceworks.

Research from the firm has found that 43% of buisiness are planning to expand their laptop investments in the next year and a quarter of firms are also looking to buy tablets.

The demand for laptops and tablets underpins a belief from 53% of customers that staff will be using mobile devices as the primary tool in the future.

“Although many predict the popularity of mobile devices will lead to the ‘death of the PC,’ this prophecy won’t become a reality anytime soon in the corporate world,” said Peter Tsai, senior technology analyst at Spiceworks.

“It’s true that desktop PCs will become less prevalent in the near future, giving way to laptops, but tablets and smartphones still face usability challenges that prevent them from enabling key tasks in the workplace. So for the foreseeable future, traditional PCs will remain dominant while tablets and smartphones serve as complementary devices," he added.

The continued interest in PCs is positive news for Dell's channel partners, with a quarter of users indicating they would be spending on that vendor.

HP and Lenovo come in next in customer preferences with customers also looking to increase the number of Microsoft PCs in the business.

Spiceworks asked customers for their wishlists when choosing to buy new PCs and found that reliability was the most important factor.

After that users wanted decent performance, to make sure the security was sound and then considered costs. Innovative features and style were considered the least important factors.

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