Essential Guide

LTFS tape NAS: What it is and how to build it

Linear Tape File System (LTFS) offers the chance to build nearline storage with the cost profile of tape and the access times of NAS. This guide walks you through LTFS and tape NAS

Introduction

In storage, cost is everything. So, imagine a storage medium with the frugal cost profile of tape and access times ofNAS. Well, it already exists. Since 2010 the Linear Tape File System (LTFS) has allowed access to tapes as if they are spinning disk. Part of the LTO-5 tape format, LTFS partitions the tape, with one containing indexing information for all the data on the cartridge and the other contains the actual data. Marry this capability to a hardware NAS protocol front end with a disk cache and you have the potential for rapid access to massive amounts of data held on tape.

Tiered storage is now mainstream. We have super-rapid flash for virtual machines and their data; Fibre Channel and 15k SAS for other fast access use cases. After that there is high-capacity SATA for bulk data, but here is where LTFS could start treading on the toes of disk vendors. That’s because, in some cases, where the use profile of data requires long retention and infrequent but relatively quick access, LTFS tape now rivals large capacity SATA as a nearline store.

Maybe that’s why LTFS has failed to set the world on fire; there are just too many disk vendors who see it as a threat. Nevertheless, LTFS is worth looking at. And in this ComputerWeekly.com Guide you’ll find articles on why LTFS should be taken seriously and explanations of how tape NAS works and who sells products.

Essential Guide to LTFS tape NAS (PDF)

1All about LTFS-

LTFS News and Features

E-Zine

Smarter storage from metadata, object stores

One of the distinguishing features of object storage systems is their ability to package more metadata with each object they store. That metadata could be used to restrict access, define a file's lifecycle and its ultimate disposition. Other storage products are emerging that can do the same or similar type of data classification. This allows data management tasks to be automated via policies set by IT, thus creating smarter storage systems.

Enterprise file sync-and-share use has taken off in many organizations, but consumer file sync-and-share use can leave corporate data unprotected. In-house EFSS can help guard against data loss by giving IT oversight and control.

Today, organizations face a wide array of storage challenges. Luckily, there are myriad training and certification opportunities for IT pros looking to bolster their knowledge of the storage technologies.

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News

Tape NAS emerges, utilizing LTFS for file access

Tape NAS brings file-level access to LTO tape for archiving, but Crossroads StrongBox is alone among hardware that takes full advantage of LTFS. Continue Reading

News

IBM adds Linear Tape File System support, larger drives to tape libraries

IBM becomes the first vendor to add Linear Tape File System (LTFS) support for tape libraries, and expands its TS3550 library to 2.7 exabytes of compressed data capacity. Continue Reading

News

Quantum launches Scalar LTFS appliance for file archiving

Quantum’s Scalar LTFS appliance brings linear tape file system (LTFS) support to its tape libraries, making it easier to access files on tape. Continue Reading

Answer

What you need to know about LTO-5 and the Linear Tape File System (LTFS)

Jon Toigo, founder and CEO of Toigo Partners International, discusses LTO-5 tape and what you need to know before using the Linear Tape File System. Continue Reading

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