Vendors form OpenDaylight Project for SDN

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Vendors form OpenDaylight Project for SDN

Jennifer Scott

The Linux Foundation today announced the formation of a new scheme aiming to boost the adoption and innovation around software defined networking(SDN).

The OpenDaylight Project is a framework based on open source technologies that the Foundation hopes top suppliers and members of the networking community will work together on, sharing ideas on SDN and how to further the technology’s reach.

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Cisco, Brocade and Juniper Networks are already signed up, alongside Big Switch Networks, Citrix, Ericsson, IBM, Microsoft, NEC, Red Hat and VMware, promising to donate software and engineering resources to work on the framework.

The mantra adopted by the group is to create an open platform any developer can build on and anyone can contribute to.

“This is a rare gathering of leaders in the technology ecosystem who have decided to combine efforts in a common platform in order to innovate faster and build better products for their customers,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation.

“The world has learned that collaborative development can quickly drive software innovation, especially in fast moving markets. We are excited to be working with OpenDaylight and expect truly amazing things to come.”

OpenDaylight will support the current standard of choice for most networking companies – OpenFlow – but hopes to grow an entire platform and bring those arguing about what standard is right onto the same page.

The first code from the project should be launched in the third quarter of 2013, with the Foundation saying an open controller, a virtual overlay network, protocol plug-ins and switch device enhancements can be expected.


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