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Google Chrome more popular than Microsoft Internet Explorer

Warwick Ashford

Google Chrome is more popular than Microsoft Internet Explorer, according to independent weekend figures.

According to web traffic monitoring firm StatCounter, Chrome took the lead at the weekend when office workers were using their own computers – that are not controlled by corporate IT departments.

StatCounter's data is collected from a sample of more than 15 billion page views on more than three million websites.

"While it is only one day, this is a milestone," said Aodhan Cullen, StatCounter's chief executive told the Telegraph.

At weekends, when people are free to choose what browser to use, many opt for Google Chrome in preference to Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE), Cullen said.

On Sunday, 18 March, Chrome was used for 32.7% of all browsing, while IE had 32.5% share. But when people returned to work on Monday, IE's share returned to 35% and Chrome's share to 30%.

Chrome's big initial growth was documented by StatCounter in mid-2011, when the analytics firm reported that, in the period June 2009 to June 2011, Google's Chrome web browser increased global market share to over 20% from 3% in 2009, while Microsoft IE usage declined.                   

In the same period, IE market share fell from 59% to 44%, while Firefox use declined from 30% to 28%. In December, Chrome ousted Firefox from second to third position worldwide.

"Whether Chrome can take the lead in the browser wars in the long term remains to be seen, however the trend towards Chrome usage at weekends is undeniable," said Cullen.

On a monthly basis, Chrome's market share has climbed to 31% in March 2012 from 17% a year ago, while IE has slipped to 35%, from 45% a year earlier.


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