Generation Y is a myth, says Corporate Executive Board research

News

Generation Y is a myth, says Corporate Executive Board research

Bill Goodwin

Generation Y – the computer-literate youngsters who need the latest high-tech gadget to work effectively – is a myth, the latest research reveals.

Businesses have been agonising how to make the workplace attractive to bright youngsters who have grown up with latest gadgets, online networking tools and high-spec computers.

40143_School-children-on-PCs.jpg

But Generation Y is no more likely to be at the cutting edge of workplace technology than older employees, a survey of 10,000 knowledge workers by the Corporate Executive Board, a group for senior business executives, reveals.

“Generation Y is a myth,” said Mark Tonsetic, senior research director in the CEB IT technology practice. “We looked at age, industry, job type, and frankly we saw no meaningful correlations between them and the way people approached technology.”

Leading employers have introduced buy your own computer initiatives, which free employees to choose the computers and mobile phones best suited to their needs, in an attempt attract young talent.

But the research shows, that contrary to popular wisdom, Generation Y-ers don’t regard having access to the latest technology, as a high priority factor when choosing an employer.

Older workers were far more interested in having laptops and mobile phones to allow them to work away from  the office, the survey revealed.

“Typically if you are in Generation X , you are in your late 30s or early 40s, you have achieved a certain level of responsibility at work, and you are likely to have family responsibility. You are far more likely to be focused on flexible working,” he said.


Email Alerts

Register now to receive ComputerWeekly.com IT-related news, guides and more, delivered to your inbox.
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
 

COMMENTS powered by Disqus  //  Commenting policy