Scottish bankruptcy agency outsources system development

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Scottish bankruptcy agency outsources system development

Karl Flinders

Scotland’s insolvency service has outsourced the development and support of its latest insolvency registration service to supplier Lockheed Martin.

The organisation, Accountant in Bankruptcy (AiB), will develop the new Case Information System by March 2015 and will support it for almost another year. It will replace the AiB’s Multifunctional Insolvency Database Administration System (Midas), which Lockheed Martin has supported for the last five years.

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This understanding of the business was critical when choosing a service provider to develop the software. 

“Our partnership with AiB over the last five years gives us the insight to tailor the software design taking into account its objectives, key features and daily challenges,” said Alastair O’Brien, public services director at Lockheed Martin.

The supplier recently provided an online system to the AiB, called Astra, which registers, advertises and processes trust deeds in Scotland.

The contract was awarded through the Scottish Government’s Applications Web Development and Associated Services Framework.

Lockheed Martin is best known for its work in security, defence and aerospace but also has an IT systems business. It employs about 3,000 people in the UK across 20 sites.

A number of suppliers are targeting the Scottish public sector. According to the UK CEO of Steria, part of the advantage of its recent partnership with fellow French IT services supplier Sopra is that it gives Steria – which is already strong in the English public sector – a strong customer base in Scottish government.

 

 

 

 


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