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Royal Mail recruits data scientists to support £70m barcode drive

Brian McKenna

The newly privatised Royal Mail is recruiting data scientists across the data management field, from Hadoop heads to statisticians.

In a job advertisement the Royal Mail Group said it is “investing in new data capabilities". It described the capability as “multi-function … using data science, data mining, data discovery and data visualisation methods to drive innovation”.

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The company said it plans to analyse the information it records about its performance “when collecting, sorting, distributing and delivering 58 million items on average a day”.

To do this, Royal Mail is looking for data professionals in the fields of data science and data modelling, as well as developers. It is looking for people with experience in quantitative analysis, data modelling, data architecture, data visualisation and programming.

It is aiming to bring in the full range of data management, business intelligence and business analytics skills, citing statistical modelling, data modelling and scripting languages, including Python.

IT professionals with knowledge of big data technologies, specifically Hadoop and MapReduce, are being sought, as are those with master data management (MDM), extract, transform and load (ETL), and traditional data warehousing knowledge. 

The company wants business information professionals both on the traditional side, with experience of SAP BusinessObjects and statistical packages from SAS and IBM’s SPSS, and on the data discovery side, with experience of Tableau and QlikView.

Royal Mail says it is spending £70m on a major initiative to add barcodes to letters so that large companies can track their mail through the postal network.

"This additional data will increase the value of mail to businesses by providing them with the ability to track bulk mail consignments through to delivery round. The initiative will enable businesses to improve efficiency, better monitor the success of marketing campaigns and link them with other activities,” said Royal Mail.


Image courtesy of Scott Beale, Laughing Squid.


 

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