Mozilla 1.1 browser is more stable

News

Mozilla 1.1 browser is more stable

Hot on the heels of version 1.0, open source organisation Mozilla has released version 1.1 of its Web browser. Improved stability and Web-page compatibility, and a number of tweaks, have been added to the latest release, writes Antony Adshead.

Version 1.1 comes only two months after the release of version 1.0 as open source developer factions fought for years over what state of completeness the browser should be released in.

Mozilla was formed after Netscape's decision in 1998 to release the source code for its browser.

Netscape's idea in releasing the code was that in return for making it public the company would benefit by being able to incorporate, for free, the efforts of an enthusiastic developer community back into its products. Such improvements are also incorporated into other open source browsers, such as the Linux-platform software Galeon.

Improvements claimed for the new release include better performance, stability and Internet compatibility. A number of new features include icons for the various Mozilla applications, automatic triggering of Microsoft Windows network dial-up, improved download manager and better drag-and-drop features.

Version 1.0 was nearly four years in the making as the developer community set about work on the Netscape source code.

While incorporating features such as tabbed browsing, a chat client and the ability to reduce pop-up ads by turning off Javascript features, developers argued about when to release the software.

One group favoured early release without full support for Web standards while the other held out for the widest possible compatibility.

The conflict arose because owners of proprietary modules within the Netscape code refused to release their software - leaving large holes.

Email Alerts

Register now to receive ComputerWeekly.com IT-related news, guides and more, delivered to your inbox.
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
 

COMMENTS powered by Disqus  //  Commenting policy