April 2010 Archives

The Digital Economy (emergency) Act?

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More

Last night, at the Convergence Conversation (Digital Economy Bill, Swan or Albatross) there was surprisingly unanimity across Telcos, ISPs and even Content producers that the agreement of the LibDems and Conservatives to the rushed compromise over the Bill had been a mistake. Their aim had been to get the Act out of the way so that the new government could concentrate on sorting out Public Finances before the IMF did it for them - but it was likely to backfire on all concerned. 

Decimating the cost of broadband roll-out: the digital village pump

| 2 Comments | No TrackBacks
| More

When a Roman Legion was "decimated" it suffered a literal 10% head-count cut. The UK public sector is about to be more than decimated by the IMF, unless the post-election National Government takes rapid and credible action in its first hundred days. Action to cut the cost of broadband roll-out by 50% (or more) and to use universal access to cut the cost of on-line service delivery by 50% and more should part of that hundred days.

The Semantic Web - Is It Worth It? (A guest blog)

| 4 Comments | No TrackBacks
| More

I have watched attempts to produce automated means of tracking and tracing the provenance of on-line data for well over a decade - as a succession of snake-oil salesmen have tried to persuade naive users and politicians that their mash-up tools will turn an "on-line waste tip of unvalidated government data files" into something more than e-slurry.

I had hoped to have a speaker on progress with the Semantic Web at the recent "Uncovering the truth" workshop on data quality organised by the Information Society Alliance (EURIM) and the Audit Commission because I had long thought it provides part of the "answer". 

However Sean Barker has suggested that it is the little more than latest excuse for not applying traditional data standards: an expensive academic exercise that will led no-where. I therefore asked him to do a "guest blog". I will not comment further and await your comments.

Will Google do what Government will not? - Utopia

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More

The Convergence Conversation has just sent me a splendid clip in which the Mayors of the communities that have come together in the UTOPIA consortium (in Utah) ask Google to use them for one of its pilots. There is actually a pair of clips. The second summarises what the communities have already done to clear the obstacles to roll out. 

Has the Digital Economy (Prohibition) Act killed public wifi?

| 2 Comments | No TrackBacks
| More

Peter Scargill, National IT Chairman of the Federation of Small Businesses has said that members providing wifi in pubs, restaurants, guesthouses and hotels have already started switching off their facilities.  Zdnet warned this would happen. Silicon.com commented on Government's "Digital Schizophrenia". Others expressed similar concerns.  It looks as though they were all too right.

When IT Meets the General Election: How do the manifestos compare with what the ICT industy wants?

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More
Computer Weekly and others are publishing summaries of the technology policies of the main parties and collecting shopping lists from interest groups. How do they compare? Not well. All parties are going to provide broadband and efficiency but say little about how, save that they are going to halt big IT projects and go open source. However, the manifestos say little or nothing about the need for rapid and effective action to improve workforce skills and professionalism, both in-house (Government as an intelligenct user and efficient buyer) and across the IT industry at large.

A challenging universal broadband (16 Mbps) target at last

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More
A mnaifesto commitment is a manifesto commitment. How much policy is based on the rationalisation of unwise ministerial soundbites. £12 billion of NHS spend was committed on the basis of 10 minutes at Number 10 and Many (perhaps even most) hospital and GPs systems arev not yet back to where they were before. Whether on not 2 megabytes is a misprint for 2 megabits it is the correct vision for 2012. We should welcome it and work out how to help deliver it, at affordable cost, reliably snd securely and get the other parties to at least match that level of commitment,

The Earl of Erroll takes over at EURIM: a chairman you can dance

| 1 Comment | No TrackBacks
| More

The Information Society Alliance has just appointed the only electronic security professional in any legislature as its Chairman. The Earl of Erroll is one of the UK's most experienced parliamentarians, a cross bench member of the House of Lords since 1978 and professionally competant. He recently debugged a voice recognition system. he also serves on boards concerned with Internet Governance, Information Security and Smart Card Standards. 

 

Should you have a choice whether your personal information is sent offshore?

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More
The revelation that NHS trusts are routinely sending personal records for processing in a nation with no data protection legislation reminds me of when a former Inland Revenue CIO suggested (at a PITCOM meeting) that it be made a criminal offence to send data collected under statutory powers off-shore for processing. He had discovered that, despite a prohibition in the contract, one of their suppliers had sent a file containing current records to the USA for testing they had been told was being done in the UK. 

HMG proposes censorship by "hearsay" for the Internet

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More
The "wash-up" session before a General Election is usually used for essential but non-controversial legislation. It looks as though the bipartisan effort to get the Digital Economy Bill out of the way, (so that the next Government is not diverted from other tasks), may saddle us with legislation as constructive and well thought out as the Volstead Act. Outlaw.com carries a good article summarising points made by Lillian Edwards on the latest clause to be proposed.   

How many died when West London lost its networks?

| 1 Comment | No TrackBacks
| More
As yet it is unclear how many lost their phone and broadband connections and for how long, as a result of the flood and fire at the Paddington exchange yesterday but it is reported to have affected over 400 exchanges. HMG has just released its long awaited Cyber Crime Strategy but we should never forget that fire, flood and digititis (finger trouble) still a more common threat to those who place over-reliance on technology than is criminal attack. Hence the need for anyone whose business, let alone life, depends on always-on communications.to adopt a genuinely multi-channel approach to resilience.

About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries from April 2010 listed from newest to oldest.

March 2010 is the previous archive.

May 2010 is the next archive.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Archives

Recent Comments

David Moss on Is Universal Credit on th... : "By Philip Virgo on September 9, 2013 12:04 PM" To...
Philip Virgo on Who do you trust less? Go... : This is a good point but raises the question of wh...
Paul Rhodes on Who do you trust less? Go... : Risk is about more than threat it is also about im...
Philip Virgo on How many Bradley Mannings... : I fully accept your point regarding spell/grammer ...
Marc Escreet on How many Bradley Mannings... : Whilst all this is opaque, to the public, the shee...
Rob Kenna on BT to give fibre to the p... : OK so you can't talk about anything but "contentio...
Philip Virgo on Why can't small firms adj... : I am hoping that this post may draw responses from...
Darren Graci on Why can't small firms adj... : Have the businesses in the local area thought abou...
jo small on How rural is Smithfield (... : Ah, totally agree. Let's also discuss a fund for t...
Philip Thomp on BT to give fibre to the p... : GFor comparison, Gigaclear costs £69/month for Hom...

 

-- Advertisement --