Hope for Mckinnon, but has anything changed?

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This is a bit off my beaten track as it has nothing to do with outsourcing, but as Computer Weekly has followed the case of Pentagon hacker Gary Mckinnon so closely I thought it worth writing about the latest developments to try and get some feedback.

Yesterday following Barack Obama's address to UK journalists with David Cameron (see video below) there was a bit of excitement because Obama said the decision to extradite Mckinnon or not is in the hands of the UK legal system. That sounds positive to campaigners because the US has been pushing hard for him to stand trial in the US.

Gary Mckinnon hacked the Pentagon in 1999. The US government says he caused lots of damage. Mckinnon says he was looking for evidence of UFOs.

 

But despite the renewed hope in the campaign to stop the extradition does what Obama said actually change anything?

Mark Ballard is a journalist who has followed the case closely. He said: "Obama said, it's in the hands of the British, we trust they'll do it within the law. Cameron said it's in the hands of the Home Secretary, we trust she'll do it within the law. The law says there's no reason to stop an extradition on grounds given. It's not as hopeful as McKinnon's Mum hopes."

See these articles about Gary Mckinnon by Mark Ballard.

Mckinnon charges exaggerated by government

McKinnon the scapegoat

UFO Hacker suicidal over health

Expert challenges UFO hacker's $700k bill

Court throws out hacker McKinnon's appeal to Supreme Court

Former Computer weekly journalist Ian Grant has also reported in depth on Mckinnon's plight. Read an interview with Mckinnon by Ian here.

 

 


 

1 Comment

Politicians lie, they've been doing it for thousands of years, in all cultures.

They lie about small things, they lie about big things.

They lie to their colleagues, they lie to their friends, the lie to their families and they lie to the people of the country they supposedly serve.

And while they lie we pay them for it, other liers reward them for it with positions on boards of companies.

We need to radically change the system so that our futures aren't dependent on greedy, short-termists that seem to have psycopathic tendencies.

Our freedoms are getting less, our life-quality is getting less, our patience grows thin while we watch the Camerons of this world grow fat.

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This page contains a single entry by Karl Flinders published on May 26, 2011 9:24 AM.

Could India's data protection law be remedy to lingering corporate doubts? was the previous entry in this blog.

UK legal profession cetain of uncertainties of Indian data protection law is the next entry in this blog.

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