UK IT workers are leaving the UK because they are fed up

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The number of overseas workers in the UK is driving local talent out. Below is an account from a UK IT professional about why he decided to leave these shores for pastures new.

The post below was in reaction to a blog about the possibility of the UK government offshoring lots of public sector IT jobs. This is a warning to IT professionals and UK plc.

By BobF

"I just got fed up with it all, after 18 years contracting (continuously) I have now taken a permanent job in the Netherlands, this after 6 months out of work and another 6 months working for very low money in the UK (sent out 1,400 CV's in the 6 months I was out of work; I usually do apps support work for SQL, Java & .NET on UNIX/Linux/Windows web apps so hardly due to an obsolete skill set).

 Things have definitely changed for the worse in the last 4-5 years as the Intra Company Transfer bandwagon has run out of control in the UK, most of the companies I've worked for have had literally hundreds of Indian Intra Company Transfers staff on board (including a few major Government projects), and I've been to some places where even the network infrastructure and PC/Server support staff are Indian Intra Company Transfers (rotated on a yearly or 6 monthly basis of course).

 I quite often get calls from agents for jobs in the UK, and they say they can't get experienced people with skills to which I usually laugh sarcastically, and it usually ends with them asking me about living costs and accommodation and if there is much demand for recruiters over here!

UK industry is making its own bed and will have to lie in it, when was the last time you saw anyone under 30 being brought in for a trainee role who wasn't Indian Intra Company Transfer?
Since I have been working in Europe I have met many experienced UK IT workers who have moved for the same reason as me, everyone I have spoken too has said they are very unlikely to ever move back."

Thanks for you contribution to the Inside Outsourcing BobF

Also see the numbers of non EU workers in the UK

7 Comments

This absolutely mirrors my own experience. My company actually hired just one uk comp. sci graduate this year, we have about 20 indian programmers from pune and bangalore on intra-company transfer. The english grad they hired is the first one they hired in the last 3 years! Why would any uk student do comp sci today beats the shit out of me, they won't get a job at the end of it! This kid told me there were 50 applicants for his job!
I'm afraid looking abroard is increasingly looking like the only option.

I see this too on a daily basis. If any journo fancied doing some investigation [there are examples close to home]. They have entire offices staffed with Indian nationals. (This post has been edited to meet editorial policy].

I see this everyday. No one seems to care. If any journo is interested, please leave your email address so people can get in touch with you

This is precisely the reason myself and family left 4 years ago. Wages going down and having to compete with 3rd world workers living 20 to a house because of some loophole. Most of the work they did was also crap quality and if you truly take into account the real costs of using Tata or Infosys etc there isn't really that much of a saving becuase of all the extra "project managament" etc needed. Its like repairing a call: the hourly rate maybe lower but it may take twice as many hours to fix!

The UK sucks these days, leave if you can, especially if you have aspirations of having a family and owning a house one day............

Being in the IT for 25 years, through good times and bad, I've noticed an interesting phenomena: The louder the shortage shouting (you know, shortage of programmers, shortage of talent, crap like that), the worse the IT career prospects are.

As far as I can tell, it goes as follows. As economic situation quietly worsens, profit margins get thinner, and IT companies start to struggle. Management has to justify lower profits somehow. One of the best excuses is shortage of the exactly properly trained personell: "Business is booming, I succesfully negotiaded ton of excellent contracts last year, but I'm afraid to sign them, because I can't find enough resources with exact skill set necessary to carry them out. Today's youth is lazy, and they won't study IT." Once repeaded often enough by the CxOs, this argument soon finds its way into the media, where it gets amplified by academic circles, always hungry for new students and their tuitions.

So, when media start trumpeting about (critical) skill/talent/personell/staff/programmer/etc shortage/crisis, and wandering about how to get more young people and women into IT careers- Beware. Next round of layoffs is just around the corner.

If you are considering emigrating, avoid shortage shouting countries like a plague. The worst at the moment are UK, Canada, and New Zealand.

What I am interested in knowing is EXACTLY which skills are in short supply. IT is a huge subject and nobody can be a master of every facet of it. Therefore just saying there is an IT skills shortage is very vague.

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This page contains a single entry by Karl Flinders published on September 10, 2010 3:49 PM.

Does NHS IT announcement raise more questions than it answers? was the previous entry in this blog.

Why Capgemini will never build another datacentre? is the next entry in this blog.

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