May 2010 Archives

BRP NOT ERP

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More
Just been swapping notes with my mates at the heart of the enterprise software revolution that is Thingamy.

For those of you who still think of terms of ERP meaning "Enterprise Resource Process" or similar, let's start again.

ERP means... Easily Repeatable Process. It's the same deal though: predictable, linear, structured production processes that account for approximately 30% of worldwide GDP.

This is a market we are all familiar with - the world of SAP, Microsoft, Oracle and others. From my perspective it is still a spectacularly restrictive and expensive world where ISVs make you pay millions for their software (and millions more on consultancy) in order to join their club and do as they say.

The problem is that the modern IT world does not revolve around easy repetition; it's far more dynamic than that. Hence, the modern understanding of BRP or Barely Repeatable Process, which stands for a staggering 60% of worldwide GDP. These are the kind of processes you meet on a daily basis nowadays. They are unpredictable and unstructured, where the process is handled manually by hierarchies, budgets, emails, reporting, meetings and other variables.

In reailty, about 65% of resources and time in these kinds of processes is spent on handling the process/flow and not on value creation. In other words, it is the old story of IT not adding to the business but taking away from it.

Sig Rinde, CEO of Thingamy, claims his company provides the only IT solution capable of handling BRP positively with the ability to increase the world's GRP to a 67% share. This is not an idle boast and one that is being taken very seriously now by the big boys, including SAP - see Sig's blog at: http://blog.thingamy.com/

In other worlds I inhabit, such as ITSM, as mentioned recently, the likes of Sunrise Software are also trying open up what have been closed, restricted practices and make them customer-centric, rather than ISV-centric. The likes of Thingamy and, to a lesser extent, Sunrise's Sostenuto platform can be the basis for ALL new enterprise software. They are not shrink-wrap products and they are not "this is how you do it" frameworks, but simple methodologies for modelling your business in software. The likes of Cisco and others looking to expand their private universe should be looking very closely at this stuff.

It's the future and it's not orange. Apologies to any Dutch footie supporters ahead of the World Cup...



First Top Gear Now HP

| 1 Comment | No TrackBacks
| More
First we had the Top Gear boys powering cars on cow poo.

Now we have HP looking to do the very same thing for Data Centres:

http://www.hpl.hp.com/news/2010/apr-jun/HP_ASME_PAPER.pdf

Thought I'd enter the URL link the report, just in case you didn't believe me. And no, it's well past April 1st. The theory is that a farm of 10,000 cows could power 1,000 servers - 10 cows to one server in other words. So does this means that suddenly cattle farms are the hotspots for new Data Centres developments? And with the onset of virtual Data Centres do we need virtual cows?

Unfortunately it's currently only a theory on a piece of paper. Fortunately that means you don't need gas masks yet.

About to take a look at some of the 3Com H3C data centres switches that the folks at HP will be inheriting. The plan currently is to use electrical power to fire them up, but if that plan changes I'll let you know....

Meantime, a pre-test report of said switches will appear on the Broadband-Testing website (www.broadband-testing.co.uk) before the weekend, so check it out.

Just a final thought. If cow poo power sees off the wind farms that are taking over the world will be it be a case of the s**t hitting the fan big time?