Terradata and ESRI combine to map data

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At the ESRI User Conference in San Diego, CA this week, Terradata and ESRI announced a new collaboration aimed at storing business data and Geographical Information System data in the same database. The goal is to enable businesses to better understand where there customers are in order to do more focused marketing.

This use of GIS and BI data is nothing new with an increasing number of marketing departments building their own solutions over the last 20 years. What is new is that all the data from both systems is being stored in the same database. The advantage for users is that rather than have to build complex queries against multiple data sources, they can write simpler, faster queries against a single database.

There are other advantages here for users. With both sets of data inside the same database, new data can be automatically matched with GIS information as it is entered. For any retailer doing overnight updates of their store data into a central BI system this provides them with the ability to create "next day" marketing campaigns aimed at individual stores. For large retailers, such as supermarkets, this is going to be highly attractive.

As well as retailers, Terradata and ESRI are targeting a number of other vertical markets such as telecommunications, utilities, transportation and government departments. In all these cases, being able to map usage and consumption to GIS data will mean the ability to deliver better services as need arises.

One area that will benefit highly is emergency response to situations where the mapping element of the GIS data will enable response teams in the field to immediately match population location with access routes. It will also provide them with the ability to create safe zones based on local geography without the problem of trying to match conditions on the ground with remote operations staff.

All of this marks a switch away from the integration plans of IBM, Oracle, Microsoft and others who believe that the future is in being able to access multiple data sources at query time and it will be interesting to see how long it takes for the others to follow Terradata's example. One company who could move quickly down this route is Microsoft by using its Bing Maps data but they currently have no plans to do so.

Archived comments:

Matt | July 16, 2010 5:32 PM

"What is new is that all the data from both systems is being stored in the same database. The advantage for users is that rather than have to build complex queries against multiple data sources, they can write simpler, faster queries against a single database."

How is this new? It has been possible to do this for years with Oracle/Spatial or PostgreSQL/PostGIS. The main stumbling block for ESRI users has been ESRI's proprietary data structures and expensive middle tier server technology and its historically poor support for truly enterprise class RDBMS.

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This page contains a single entry by Michael Pincher published on September 21, 2011 11:10 AM.

Business Intelligence - Corporate Oxymoron or Capability was the previous entry in this blog.

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