Recently in Apple Category

The Apple Watch signals the end of the wearables market

| 1 Comment | No TrackBacks
| More
Apple-Watch-290px.jpg

There has been debate over the number of pre-orders made for the soon to be available Apple Watch, with an estimate coming in at over two million - more than the number of Android wearables sold in the last year.

But Scott Galloway, professor of marketing at NYU, and founder of business intelligence company L2, says wearables are dead.

At the Demandware Xchange 2015 conference in Las Vegas, Galloway claimed the Apple Watch signals a nail in the coffin of the wearables market, because everything people can do on a wearable they can do on their phone.

According to Galloway the Apple Watch is the deathblow to the overestimated wearables market, because the current conception of wearables is just an extension of your phone that does not add much additional value.

As a luxury brand, people are buying the Apple Watch as a status symbol rather than for its functionality, and Apple has been able to drive these sales because its brand is so strong they know exactly how to appeal to customers.

"To get someone to put something on their person, that's such a delicate incredibly difficult thing to do." says Galloway.

Just as in the fashion industry, retailers have to put careful consideration into the design and branding of products because anything you put on your person contributes to people's outward impression of you, and what you wear says something about you.

According to Galloway this is also part of the reason that Google Glass proved not to be as successful as other wearables - Apple knows how to use their brand to appeal to a large market who will pay for the privilege of being an Apple user, something Google proved not to get right.

Not only does the Apple Watch act as an extension of your iPhone but it also measures your fitness by tracking steps, movement, heartrate and uses the iPhone's GPS to track distance of travel.

So what does that mean for wearables such as fitness trackers, or even applications that use your phone to track lifestyle? We'll just have to see.

Smart Kapp - An image capture dry-wipe whiteboard

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More

SMART technologies, the company which brought interactive whiteboards into our classrooms, has developed a new dry-erase whiteboard capable of sending images to your smartphone. 

 

The digital capture white board is designed to replace the paper flip-chart often seen in meetings and conferences. 

 

It comes with a dry-erase marker, a board rubber, and a power cable. And that's it. 

 

The setup was designed to be as simple as hanging a whiteboard in a meeting room. All that's needed to use the mirroring capabilities is for one person in the meeting to have a smartphone running Android or iOS. 

 

Windows phone is currently out of the loop, but images can be taken from the board via USB as well. Negotiations are currently taking place over the direction of using Windows Phone with the Kapp, so watch this space.


smartkapp1.jpg

 

One person takes control of the meeting by scanning the board's QR code through the dedicated app, or tapping the NFC spot. Once activated, anything on the board will appear in the smartphone session. 

 

Snapshots can be taken of the board at a specific point in time to ensure important information isn't erased, and people can be added to the meeting using links which are trashed after the meeting ends, or emailed images of the board while the meeting is in session.


The board is programmed to recognise the measurements of of a dry-wipe marker and mirrors any indication of pressure on the app. So technically, you could use a stylus with the same diameter as a marker tip to write secret messages on the board that would only register to smartphone participants. 


IMG_1748.JPG

 

In particular the company has seen great interest from the hotel industry for use in conference rooms, and hotels would no longer have to worry about providing paper.

 

But the most interesting thing about the board is the vast number of industries interested in this particular product - something unusual for a business-focused gadget.

 

"Dry erase boards are ubiquitous, there's no particular industry where you would say 'it's just for these guys and them only'." explains Christine Alford, manager of SMART marketing communications.

 

This week the company announced a huge 84 inch model of the board, the Kapp 84, which is now available on pre-order, and premium services offering a free upgrade to the smart mobile application to allow up to 250 participants per session.

 

The smaller version will set you back £599, while the 84 inch board is £849. 

CES 2015: A summary of this year's Consumer Electronics Show

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More

As a first-time attendee of CES I distinctly remember thinking on my flight over to Vegas: "What have I let myself in for?"

It turns out the answer was a week of no sleep, motivational videos designed to make you cry and more gadgets than I could shake a stick at. It doesn't matter what time it is in Vegas, there's always something going on, and with the show spread over three major areas across the city it's almost impossible to take everything in.

IMG_1593.JPG

But here are the top trends I noticed during my week in Sin City:

People aren't interested in JUST data collection anymore

One of the biggest themes of the week was the concept that devices that collect data are no longer useful unless they are able to interpret it and make changes for the better.

At the show, Shawn G DuBravac, chief economist and senior director of research at the Consumer Electronics Association, discussed the need for a "feedback loop"  whereby the analog input method for digitisation and curation is then used to influence and change behaviour, feeding back to the original input method.

It was widely agreed across the conference that until this feedback loop occurs, digital and connected technology will not contribute towards a better and more convenient standard of living.

Everyone is focussed on making things "better"

CEA representatives were saying it, Samsung's CEO was saying it, the big boss at Intel was saying it - everyone agreed that the internet of things and other connected technologies could act as a gateway towards a better existence for human beings.

According to Samsung's keynote at the opening of the show, "better" means different things to different people, and the public said the technology of the future should "be faster", "save time" and "track efficiency".

And that's just everyday life - Intel spoke about how its RealSense technology can allow automated drones to more easily navigate on their own, allowing easier drop off of items such as medical supplies.

The firm also shared its plans for a more diverse workforce by launching its own Diversity in Technology initiative, aiming to improve not just technology but the industry itself.

The wearables market is as confused as ever

The last few years at CES has seen wearables move from a possible future concept into a full blown industry segment. The problem is, wearables still don't know what they want to be.

In the CES Marketplaces innovation hall technology booths were split into sections, which included Wearables, Health & Wellness, Fitness & Technology, Smart Watches and Sports Tech, all of which contained, amongst other things, wearables of some kind.

Some of the products could have landed in any of these categories, and the line between several of these segments is very thin.

wearables.jpg

With fashion designer Lauren Bowker claiming earlier this year that she doesn't like her scientific designs being referred to as wearable tech, it's clearly an industry that, although has many products already embedded into people's lifestyle, doesn't know where it's going.

I think wearables is a technology category becoming a bit too big for its boots, and it needs to decide where its loyalties lie - fitness, wellness or convenience.

3D printing is actually going somewhere

Last year 3D printing seemed like a gimmick that would never take off. Now it's a legitimate industry used for activities such as rapid prototyping, and many products surfaced at CES that could expand the opportunities of the 3D printing market.

Intel's plans to integrate Intel's Core i7 processors within HP's upcoming HP Multi Jet Fusion 3D printer is a step towards fast printing for functional items such as chainlinks and other working parts for the engineering industry.

3D printing.jpg

A 3D printing pen that allows users to draw a functioning 3D object was also on display in the Marketplaces hall, as well as many smaller 3D printers for home use that could solve expensive outsourcing problems for wannabe engineers.

From a concept people scoffed at to a range of technologies with practical uses, the 3D printing industry has come along in leaps and bounds.

The Chinese market is booming

Once technology was only manufactured in China on behalf of other businesses, but now Chinese companies are huge, and producing products for both domestic and international markets.

From smartphones to smarthomes, China definitely had a huge presence at the show this year, and the trend doesn't look to slow down any time soon.

IMG_1637.JPG

The internet of things and smarthomes are both the fastest growing and least developed segments

Everyone was talking about the current proliferation and development of the internet of things this year, including the smarthome and how connected devices can help to improve people's lives and save people time.

However much like wearables, some of these technologies still don't quite have the edge that's needed to make them as useful as they could be.

We discussed earlier technology must provide information that allows users to manipulate and improve their environment in order to fully prove its usefulness.

smarthome.jpg

What was also highlighted by Samsung's CEO was the need for greater collaboration between different industry segments and regulators to ensure the internet of things is able to properly move forward and work seamlessly.

Looks like we have a lot to keep an eye on over the next year! 

CES 2015: Hands on with Samsung's Galaxy Note Edge smartphone

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More

The Samsung Galaxy Note Edge's curved touchscreen is in my opinion one of the strangest design choices for a smartphone to date.

The device has been available for some time now, but seeing it in the flesh I was able to test this concept first-hand and I became aware of how difficult the device is to use.

IMG_1646.JPG

The curved screen real-estate itself is quite useful as it's easier to reach with your thumb, but it all depends on you holding the handset with your right hand.

So not only is the device inconvenient for left-handed people, but it's also too big. I would say if you're going to produce a smartphone with the purpose of having an easier-to-use touch screen you don't then develop a handset so big it doesn't fit in your hand.

IMG_1647.JPG

The curved part of the screen acts as a sort of notifications bar so you can easily access everything going on, similar to the pull down feature on an iPhone or in the new LG Flex 2.

On a positive note, the 5.6 inch screen has an AMOLED Quad HD+ display that is super sharp, and colours are really vivid.

One of the more useful features of the phone is the ability to multi-task with split screening allowing you to look at two applications at the same time, which could be quite useful if watching video or taking notes from a presentation or web page.

The device, which runs Android, has a 16mp camera and dual SIM ports, as well as 3GB of RAM and up to 18 hours of battery time during medium usage.

And the device comes with a "new and improved" S Pen for using the touchscreen.

The bad news? It comes in at around £700, but it was announced this week the phone is available for a slightly cheaper price tag through Verizon in the US. Better start saving. 

"OK Google..."

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More

Earlier this year I wandered around Holborn until I discovered a life sized Google map pin pointing towards a concealed door to a warehouse.

Inside was an intricate maze of concealed doors, rooms behind book cases and tunnels in the back of fridges - an experience designed to highlight the usefulness of the various Google apps available on smartphones.

 

Google search app

The setting was a kitchen, and a very specific salad recipe made with unknown ingredients. We were encouraged to shout various commands at Google to find out what ingredients we were meant to use and what they looked like.

I use an iPhone, so Siri would usually be my go-to for such things (and I gave up on him a long time ago) and it was very reminiscent of days spent asking Siri mundane questions.

Using the "O.K Google" feature to power the Google search app was a little clumsy at times, it not always understanding my accent and misinterpreting the words. When it did pick up what I said it was useful, especially with Google Search behind it.

JRA-OK-GOOGLE-LONDON-8600.jpg

Image: Google

The most useful thing about it is the app's ability to recognise context in what you're asking it. It uses key phrases in your previous sentence, such as names, to add context on any follow up questions you ask about it without having to repeat the subject matter of the search. This is pretty useful, but like all things not 100% accurate.


Google Translate

The Google translate app, although perhaps not practical in a situation that requires real-time translation, is very useful for filling in knowledge gaps.

A feature I couldn't use on my iPhone, but worked well on Android, was the real-time scanning and translation feature. Using the phone's camera, text in the user's environment, such as on labels and signs, can be scanned and translated from its current dialect into the chosen language of the user. Handy if you're travelling and don't know whether you're reading the sign for a toilet or a train station platform.

JRA-OK-GOOGLE-LONDON-8138.jpg

Image: Google

There is also a feature allowing the user to type words or phrases in one language, and translate into any other language. The translation can then be read back to you in the target language to help with pronunciation.

 

Google for work

Probably the most important of the Google apps for business users are the Google apps that enable remote working and picking up where you left off on any device.

There are a combination of apps that help with this, including docs, sheets and slides for editing, and Drive for storing and file sharing between computers and individuals.

These can be used either on and offline, and also collaboratively so updates can be made and shared with other participants of a document.

JRA-OK-GOOGLE-LONDON-9101.jpg

Image: Google

This sort of thing always works better if you're on a phone or tablet, as a laptop has the ability to perform most of these tasks offline without the need for such applications.

Although not all functionality is available, it still makes document collaboration and sharing a lot easier, especially on the move.

Drive for work allows users to edit files on iOS and Android devices, and on the web, and allows several people to update documents at the same time if online, and auto-saves to ensure changes aren't lost. 

What can be defined as wearable tech?

| 1 Comment | No TrackBacks
| More

We're slowly moving into the wearable generation, and the number of people bringing wearables into the workplace is steadily increasing.

The battle of wearable technology is in full swing, with Microsoft launching its first wearable device just months after Apple announced plans for its Apple Watch. 

When many people think of wearables, fitness trackers and smartwatches are what spring to mind.

But wearable technology can be anything from a health monitor to mobile controlled garments.

Or can it? Designer Lauren Bowker, founder of The Unseen, has roots in Chemistry and has developed a range of clothing that reacts to biological and chemical stimulus as opposed to just electrical.

Her garments, which she recently showcased at the Innovate UK event in London, are "human focussed" and include pieces that change colour depending "environmental fluctuations" or stimulation from the brain.

The first piece is made of leather and changes colour in reaction to the wind and air. Originally Bowker thought this type of technology could be used for F1 in order to assess the aerodynamics of vehicles, but began developing clothes designed to reflect the way wind and air passes over the human body.

theunseenphoto1.jpg

Another piece reacts to heat in the brain and therefore changes colour depending on your thoughts. It could be used in healthcare to communicate feelings that are hidden.

She says in the future, she hopes materials will be created for purpose, and there will be no need for disposable fashion, as one garment can be adapted to be suitable for all situations, moods and weather.  

theunseenphoto5.jpg

But she doesn't believe this is wearable tech, to her it's just material.

"Everyone is calling The Unseen wearable tech whereas we really don't want to be called wearable tech. There's wearable computing, which I see more as the smartwatches," Bowker says. "That to me is just another gadget."

Bowker points out that other fabrics such as polyester could been deemed wearable tech if the way it is used it taken into consideration, so people should be careful to address specific categories garments fall under.

theunseenphoto3.jpg

"Treat this as a design-led project rather than a recent trend." Bowker says.

A recent survey by Beecham Research found technology companies do not have the right approach to wearable technology and devices are not what consumers want to wear.

Not for profit organisation the London College of Fashion's 'Innovation Agency' works with technology companies to make technology driven clothing.

Matthew Drinkwater, head of the agency, describes working with Nokia on a digital skirt made of smartphones, and collaborating with Microsoft to create trousers that charge your phone in your pocket as just some of the projects the agency has worked on.

At Innovate UK Drinkwater showcased the Innovation Agency's Tinkerbell inspired dress, created during a collaboration with Disney using fibre optics and LEDs.

theunseenphoto4.jpg

But again, he claims wearables should centre on fashion instead of simply being another branch of technology.

Drinkwater says: "Everything before had been functionality focus and device focus, we just want to try and use tech to make something really beautiful."


Apple announces iPad Air 2

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More
Apple has announced the new iPad Air 2. We won't lie, we were expecting a more innovative name...

Somehow as soon as an Apple event rolls around, everyone already knows what's going to happen. As predicted, just a month after the release of the new iPhone 6 and iOS 8 operating system, Apple has announced its new iPad, the Air 2. 

Apple skeptics will be mockingly asking "but what's new about it?" and loosely quoting Daft Punk I'll reply: "it's smarter, better, faster and smaller." 

That's right, although the iPad Air 2 supports the same screen size as the iPad Air, it's thinner than it's ever been at just 6.1mm thick, and weighs less than a pound. Apple claims this is currently the thinnest tablet on the market. 

ipadair22.jpg
Both the Air 2 and new iPad mini 3 have new retina display screens, making images look more crisp and real than real life, excellent for fuelling your Netflix addiction. Or, of course, viewing and writing documents and presentations when working on the move. 

As with the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, the new iPads come equipped with improved Touch ID for secure access and use of Apple Pay authentication within apps. 

The device still offers 10 hours of battery life, and it's internals support an Apple A8X chip to boost CPU.


Ipadair2.jpg
Sadly, although I'm sure these new devices provide a better user experience than their predecessors, it circles back to a concept I looked at earlier this year: how far can hardware innovation really go

Can devices only continue to get thinner and faster, or is there something more to look forward to? We'll have to wait to find out. 

In the meantime, the Apple iPad Air 2 is available to order online from a starting price of around $499 (approx. £309) 

Specs at a glance: 
iPad Air 2 
  • Processor: A8x 64 bit processor and M8 coprocessor 
  • Dimensions: 240mm x 169.5mm x 6.1mm
  • Capacity: 16GB, 64GB, 128 GB
  • Display: 9.7 inch Retina display 
  • Camera: 8mpx back mounted camera, 1.2 mpg front facing camera
  • Battery: 10 hours heavy usage

iPhone 6 - features and functionality

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More

Consumers and businesses alike have been waiting with bated breath for the announcement of the iPhone 6 and the constantly-discussed Apple Watch. We wrote our predictions about what we thought the new devices would offer, now it's time to fill you in on what the new iPhone is really capable of.

The iPhone 6 comes in two sizes, iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, which could be called large and extra-large.

Thumbnail image for iPhone6iPhone6plus.jpg

Image: Apple

The smaller model comes in at 4.7 inches, a whole 0.7 inches bigger than its iPhone 5S and 5C predecessors. The Plus hits phablet size at 5.5 inches, and both have Retina HD displays for pictures so high def, they look like real life.

The handsets look to be at their most curvy, and also claim to be at their thinnest at 6.9mm thick for the iPhone 6 and 7.1mm thick for the Plus. The space grey colour that I love so much also seems to have made an appearance on the devices, so they can perfectly match your iPad Air or iPad mini.

As predicted, the handsets are NFC capable, and this can be used for contactless mobile payments.

iphone6iphone6plus2.jpg

Image: Apple

The chipsets promise high-powered performance, with 64-bit architecture propping up an A8 chip and M8 motion coprocessor driving data gathering from built-in sensors.

As well as everything else, the camera has received a makeover. The iSight is capable of faster autofocus, 240fps slow motion capture, and 1080p HD image capture at 60fps.

Finally, the Touch ID feature allows the user to access the device or purchase apps password-free using their fingerprint.

Specs at a glance:

iPhone 6

    • Capacity: 16GB, 64GB, 128GB
    • Weight: 129g
    • Size: 67mm width, 138.1 mm height, 6.9mm thick
    • Display: 4.7inch 1334x750 resolution, 326 ppi
    • Battery: Up to 10 hours with heavy use, or 10 days on standby
    • OS: IOS 8

 

iPhone 6 Plus

    • Weight: 172g
    • Size: 77.8mm width, 158.1 mm height, 7.1mm thick
    • Capacity: 16GB, 64GB, 128GB
    • Display: 5.5inch 1920x1080 resolution, 401 ppi
    • Battery: Up to 12 hours with heavy use or 16 days on standby
    • OS: IOS 8


Both devices are available in Silver, Gold and Space Grey. Check back to the Inspect-a-gadget soon for a full iPhone 6 review.

iPhone 6: The specs we're all hoping for

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More
Thumbnail image for apple logo.png

Rumour has it images of the iPhone 6 were leaked last week, with pictures alluding to a potential release date of September 9th for the much coveted next generation device.

A number of other speculations have also been flying around, including NFC potential, heart rate monitors and wireless charging.

But what does everyone really want from their iPhone? We've reported before on how it can be very difficult to incorporate Apple products in the enterprise due to the high cost of support. This might not be solved with a new handset, but a number of SDKs were released at the WWDC 2014 to give developers a better in to the device, and enhanced device features such as NFC could bridge this gap even further.

Here's a roundup of what could be coming up in Apple's big announcement if everything we've been hearing is true:

Touch ID

Phones like the Samsung Galaxy S5 and the previous iPhone 5S have toyed with fingerprint ID to safely unlock the phone, so it would make sense it the iPhone 6 had an improved version of this technology.

NFC

A lot of other phones already have NFC capabilities built in, and with contactless-everything on the rise this is a feature that will come in extremely handy and is widely expected.

iOS 8

With a new phone comes a new mobile operating system, and the new iOS 8 promises features such as easy-to-develop applications for developers due to the new API kits available, improved messaging and smart keyboard. As far as being included in the iPhone 6 package, this one is pretty much a given.

iWatch

The wearable trend is rapidly increasing, and a number of premium vendors are now jumping on the band wagon with their own bond-style watches and wristbands. If you're like me, you're waiting to see what Apple has to offer before deciding on which wearable to invest in - and if an iWatch is on the cards as a supplementary device to the new iPhone, it looks like we'll all have a little less money by Christmas.

Check back to the Inspect-a-Gadget for further coverage on new Apple announcements. 

Apple announces iOS 8 at WWDC 2014

| No Comments | No TrackBacks
| More

At this week's WWDC 2014 - the conference that tells developers everything they need to know about what Apple has planned for the future - Apple introduced its next mobile operating system iOS 8.

Thumbnail image for apple logo.png

The new OS brings with it over 4000 new APIs in order to allow developers more opportunity to make applications for Apple's flagship iPad and iPhone devices.

There was a focus on the new HealthKit API, which will allow developers to build apps directed towards fitness and health services. With speculation of an Apple wearable on the horizon, enabling applications such as this could be a step in the smartwatch direction.

Apple also took a leap towards the internet-of-things trend with its new HomeKit API, designed to allow developers to make apps that will allow communication with other devices around the home.

Finally, Apple lightened the restrictions on its touch ID technology, meaning that users will now not only be allowed to access their iPhone lockscreens with the touchpad, but also log into apps. This is of course only on the 5S at the moment, but may also be used with future iPhones.

Although this announcement isn't quite as exciting as the eagerly speculated iWatch, it still encourages the use of smartbands/watches with Apple devices in the future, and brings us one step closer to using our phones to control all things household.

Developers have access to iOS 8 now, but the rest of us will just have to wait.


Archives

Subscribe to blog feed

Recent Comments

  • Charles Duance: I agree this is market hype as usual from Apple. read more
  • Charles Duance: How will the customer know that the price of the read more
  • Jeffery Moss: I am a RETIRED Laboratory Technician and Electronics Geek who read more
  • Emad Uddin: I am not Sure Such garments can be wearable in read more
  • ryan calara: I have this device called smart watch..i used this when read more
  • William Virtue: Seriously... I have used Skye for years. Recent,y my wife read more
  • David McClelland: Thanks for your comments, Martin. Heat: speculation, but I wonder read more
  • Jeremy Lloyd: "Specs at a glance"... no GLANCE option! Screen display is read more
  • Martin Paul: Also, shame about the "no expansion" thing. I like my read more
  • Martin Paul: "Also worth pointing out is that the chassis can get read more

About this Archive

This page is an archive of recent entries in the Apple category.

Android is the previous category.

Applications is the next category.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.