Christmas gadget gift: iStorage datAshur Secure USB Flash Drive REVIEW

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Everyone has had that moment where they open their bag or desk drawer and their USB stick is gone. The sheer panic at the thought of all of those files let loose in the world is enough to make you feel sick. That is why the iStorage datAshur secure USB drive is such a good idea your data is protected by a 7-15 digit pin, as well as military grade AES 256-bit CBC Hardware Encryption, so you know that wherever that USB stick ends up the files on it are safe. 

This nifty gadget, although slightly chunky, gives you a sense of satisfaction as you take off its aluminum case and type in the PIN, which can be re-set whenever you want. Swapping the default PIN for your own is relatively easy as long as you follow the instructions provided. The only thing they don't tell you is that once you've reached the final stage, you have to plug the USB into your computer for the new PIN to take effect. 

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If you have the right settings on your PC, the USB stick should plug and play once connected after the correct PIN is entered. If plugged in without the code, or with the wrong code, it doesn't register in the PC.

If the USB stick is not connected to a PC or Mac within 30 seconds of entering the code, the USB will re-set and the process must be started again. If the PIN is entered incorrectly 10 times in a row, the drive enters 'hacking detection' mode, and the drive must be formatted before it can be used again, ensuring that your data is completely removed and cannot be accessed.

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There is the concern that if you forget your code, or the PIN pad stops working, you won't be able to retrieve your data, making the stick good for secure transportation of documents, but not a long-term storage solution. 

The starting price for 4GB is £39.00, a small price to pay for making sure that any documents you're transporting are secure. The flash drive also includes a three-year warranty and is hack proof, both from keyloggers and brute-force attacks.

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A great stocking-filler for someone who spends a lot of time moving sensitive documents between PCs, or someone who just wants to keep their data a secret.

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About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Clare McDonald published on December 18, 2013 10:27 AM.

Nokia Lumia 2520 review - does this tablet work for work? was the previous entry in this blog.

Christmas gadget gift: PNY Technologies Portable PowerPack REVIEW is the next entry in this blog.

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