Recently in Cloud computing Category

Green Google: 'our Cloud does more with less'

David Bicknell | No Comments
| More

Google has just launched a Web page detailing its annual energy use and carbon footprint impact. 

It argues that to provide a user with Google products for a month--not just search, but Google+, Gmail, YouTube and everything else it offers - its servers use less energy per user than a light left on for three hours. And, because it says that it's been a carbon-neutral company since 2007, "even that small amount of energy is offset completely, so the carbon footprint of your life on Google is zero."

There are more details here  

It has also produced a study about powering email using the Cloud

Sustainability: driving innovation and growth in IT, telecoms and cleantech

David Bicknell | No Comments
| More

This blog by Steve Goldstein of Growth Advisors on Greenbiz.com discusses how companies in a range of industries, including the IT indstry, are using sustainability and innovation as a springboard to growth.

Goldstein makes the point that although in the communications and high-tech industry, "much has been written about how software will play an important role in monitoring environmental performance - an estimated $12 billion market this year with some of the world's and industry's leading companies like IBM, HP and SAP actively competing for it.. sustainability is playing a much larger, even pivotal role in remaking the competitive fundamentals, business models, and direction and growth of the industry itself."

He cites three sectors where an industry-wide growth opportunity is being provided by sustainability.

• High-tech equipment and services - "Cloud computing is fundamentally shifting the way enterprises use communications and high-tech products and services. Enterprises are embracing "the cloud" to reduce capital and operating expenditures. Of course, one of the biggest operating expenditures in a data centre is the cost of energy. The use of virtualisation software (central to the operating effectiveness of servers in data centers) from the leading provider (VMware) saves more power than the amount of electricity used annually for heating, ventilation and air conditioning across all of New England. Further, the energy efficiency of computing and network equipment has improved by 70 percent to 90 percent in recent years. "Cloud" is the competitive game changer and a big growth opportunity that every major player in this industry is working on and sustainability is a fundamental reason for its emergence."

• Telecom services - "For major telcos and other players in the communications business, the focus on sustainability is reviving established services like video conferencing, fleet telematics, and telecommuting that date back a few energy crises. It is also putting communications companies in position to compete for business in the rapidly growing markets for cloud, hosting and vertical solutions like e-health against IT providers. New and potentially very large markets for smart buildings, smart grids, remote monitoring, and electric vehicle charging are also in the sights of many companies in this space. Leading telco services providers are beginning to put sustainability at the centre of their product strategies and are looking to address the competitive and regulatory pressures customers are feeling around the sustainability issue. They are in a unique position to provide a broad and integrated set of solutions to the range of an enterprise's sustainability needs."

• Cleantech
- "Clearly a new and rapidly emerging, yet already large space ($188 billion market value in 2010, according to Clean Edge), more money is going into cleantech than any other communications or high-tech segment. Billions are being invested by venture funds, Internet players like Google and long established tech giants including Intel. Why? Solar, water, wind, power, electric vehicles and other cleantech products are highly dependent on information technology and communications in both their operation and distribution and represent the most significant growth and value creation opportunities in this industry for the foreseeable future."

 

Carbon Disclosure Project report details low carbon benefits of cloud computing

David Bicknell | No Comments
| More

One of the most informed and engaging writers around sustainability and business is Andrew Winston, who writes a blog called Finding the Gold in Green and writes for the Harvard Business Review as well. (The Harvard Business Review blogs, by the way, are well worth a read)

 

One of Winston's recent blogs discusses a new report from the Carbon Disclosure Project about the sustainability benefits of Cloud Computing

Here's the intro to the report:

 

Across business, executives are looking for ways in which they can operate more sustainably and thereby increase their competitive edge. Information Communications Technology (ICT) is seen as a key area of focus for achieving sustainability goals. This report shows that business use of cloud computing can play an important role in an organisation's sustainability and IT strategies: improving business process efficiency and flexibility whilst decreasing the emissions of IT operations.

 

This study used detailed case study evidence from 11 global firms and assessed the financial benefits and potential carbon reductions for a firm opting for a particular cloud computing service. It also demonstrates how projected cloud computing adoption could drive economy-wide business benefits from a financial and carbon reduction perspective in the US.

 

The results show that by 2020, large U.S. companies that use cloud computing can achieve annual energy savings of $12.3 billion and annual carbon reductions equivalent to 200 million barrels of oil - enough to power 5.7 million cars for one year.

 

The report also delves into the advantages and potential barriers to cloud computing adoption and gives insights from the multi-national firms that were interviewed.

 

In addition to a predicted aggregate, annual carbon reduction of 85.7 million metric tons by large U.S. companies, cloud computing can:

  • Help users avoid costly up-front capital investments in infrastructure
  • Improve time-to-market as a new server can be created or brought online in minutes
  • Provide greater flexibility as clouds allow firms to pay for excess capacity only when they need it
  • Avoid the continual maintenance of excess capacity needed to handle spikes
  • Improve automation that helps drive process efficiencies

"The study results make a powerful case for businesses to continue to explore and adopt secure and flexible cloud computing solutions," said John Potter, Vice President, As-a-Service Solutions, AT&T.

 

Winston added: "Finding providers and partners that can take some of your energy-using operations to scale, and manage them in a shared capacity, is good for both business' carbon footprint and its bottom line."

 

I suspect the report's conclusions on cloud computing may be a case of preaching to the converted here, but the insight of some of those interviewed for the study may be useful.

 

About this Archive

This page is an archive of recent entries in the Cloud computing category.

Climate Change is the previous category.

CRC is the next category.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Archives

-- Advertisement --