Opera Dragonfly web design and developer toolkit now buzzing

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Norwegian browser developer Opera is this week unveiling its Dragonfly web developer toolkit. The new product is emerging from its exoskeleton as a collection of tools for web design and development, with a special emphasis on debugging.

Opera Dragonfly a hybrid web application -- which means users never need to update it, since the latest version is always pulled from the web. Plus, it will always be compatible with the version of Opera being used at the time.

Opera clearly realises that the world has gone mobile -- and has provided a remote debugging tool for mobile devices this time.

A web designer/developer turns on the 'remote debugging' function and Opera Dragonfly will connect to Opera Mobile and allow for debugging directly on the device.

Opera D.png

"You can even hack your site on tablets, TVs or your colleagues' computers with the remote debugging feature. And, Opera Dragonfly can mask as other browsers to help ensure cross-platform mobile compatibility," says the company.

There are also advanced colour-picking tools, options to debug Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) and a JavaScript debugger.

"Just one wrong line and your masterful script is in ruins. So, we make it easy to go through your code with conditional breakpoints, deep property inspection and watches to turn even the most jumbled JavaScript into a thing of beauty," says Opera's press statement.

USER NOTE: Personally, I'm a big fan of Opera as I think it's a clean browser with a lot to like. But as I also run Chrome, Firefox and Safari on my Mac -- and Internet Explorer on my PC I think there are improvements that Opera needs to catch up on. Auto dragging sites into the bookmarks bar being my major bug bear, surely this needs to arrive soon?

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This page contains a single entry by Adrian Bridgwater published on May 6, 2011 9:41 AM.

Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 from a software developer's perspective was the previous entry in this blog.

First-generation firewalls do not cut the mustard is the next entry in this blog.

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